Super Bowl Squares in Google Sheets: 2 Excellent Templates

Having a few cheeky bets with your friends around big sporting events can be thrilling (although you should make sure you’re allowed to bet on the Super Bowl). Or, perhaps you want to add a prize pool to your Super Bowl party. In any case, one of the best ways to assign prizes is to use Super Bowl Squares in Google Sheets.

Download Super Bowl Squares for Google Sheets

How Do Super Bowl Squares in a Google Sheet Work?

Before we look at the Super Bowl squares Google Sheets template, let’s look at how you can play Super Bowl squares.

Create the Grids

A basic Super Bowl square is created as a grid of 10×10 squares. The two teams playing are assigned to the x and y-axis. Every column and row is assigned a random number ranging from 0 to 9. Having a 10×10 setup means that there are 100 chances to win. The random arrangement of the numbers in the rows and columns makes the game hard to predict.

Invite People to Play

Once the basic layout for the Super Bowl squares is created, it’s time to fill out the boxes. Feel free to invite people to join the square pool, or you can also join one hosted online. Online pools can be convenient as you can join one from the comfort of your home, and you can also play with strangers. For people using Google Sheets Super Bowl squares, you can invite people by sharing the spreadsheet with your friends.

Filling in the Boxes

For most Super Bowl square games, the players choose the cells before the numbers are assigned to the rows and columns. If the number of people playing is low, then a single person can select multiple cells. However, for most games, a person can only enter their name into the Super Bowl square game once.

Assign the Numbers

Once the players have added their names to the football squares in Google Sheets, we can fill the columns and rows with random numbers. If you’re using a printed version, simply write them in the empty boxes below the name of the team. You can use the RANDBETWEEN formula or type them out manually for the spreadsheet template. Make sure the random numbers don’t make any patterns.

Decide the Winner

Football scores often end in 0, 3, or 7 because of the two scoring methods: field goals and touchdowns, are usually worth three and seven points. This means that the cells containing 0, 3, and 7 will always have a bit of an advantage, especially for the first quarter. This is the reason why it’s important to make sure that the columns and rows always have randomized numbers so cheating can be prevented.

In most Super Bowl square games, the winner is decided at the end of the quarters, meaning that winners are decided after the first, second, and third quarters and the game’s final score.

The winner is chosen by looking at the last number in every team’s score and matching the numbers to the teams’ numbers in the column and rows. The intersection point will decide the winner.

Related: Build a Schedule Template in Google Sheets [Free Downloads]

Super Bowl Squares Template 2023 Google Sheets

Creating your own Google Sheets football squares template is easy. All you have to do is create a grid of 10×10 cells and add the random numbers in the column and row header. However, if you don’t want to go through the process, here are a few templates we have made for you to use. Simply make a copy of the templates and make changes so the template fulfills your needs.

Printable Google Sheet Super Bowl Squares

This template is bound to make your Superbowl watch parties much more interesting. This template is very easy to use and understand, even for someone who has no idea how the game works. We have formatted this template so you can easily print it out on paper.

Static Super Bowl Squares in Google Sheets

The template includes a cost per square cell with a Dollar ($) symbol towards the top left part of the template. Enter the price for an entry here. Then, add the team names in the row and column headers. Now, let the players add their names in the white 10×10 cells. After the names are added, write random numbers between 0 to 9 in the grey boxes in the column and rows. Make sure the numbers don’t repeat per header.

Finally, calculate and write the payouts for the quarters and finals in the Payout section towards the bottom right of the screen. Once you’re done, feel free to start playing. If you want to keep track of winners throughout the entire season, you could try out our Google Sheets bracket template.

Dynamic Super Bowl Squares in Google Sheets

This template can be used both in digital or printed form. This template automatically generates new randomized numbers in the column and row headers for the teams whenever the spreadsheet is refreshed. We did this using a combination of the RANDARRAY and RANK formulas.

Dynamic Super Bowl Squares in Google Sheets

The RANDARRAY formula can generate unique random numbers between 0 and 1. Once these are generated in an array of 10, we use the RANK formula in another column. Here, we compare the values we generated using RANDARRAY and compare them with each other.

This will then give us values between 1 and 10 randomly generated. As we wish to have values between 0 and 9, we subtract 1 from every RANK value. Repeat the same process to generate the values for both rows and columns.

Now, to ensure the values appear in the headers for both teams, we use an equal symbol and add the cell address. Google Sheets will then automatically get the value for that specific cell.

When using this sheet, make sure you make a copy. Google Sheets will automatically recalculate the value whenever the sheet is refreshed.

Note: To ensure you don’t lose the number arrangement, simply copy the data from the cells and paste it back using the Ctrl+Shift+V shortcut, which will paste the raw values without formatting.

Related: Google Sheets Workout Template (3 Free Downloads)

Wrapping Up

When using Super Bowl squares in Google Sheets, we’d recommend using the second template as the RANDARRAY and RANK formula makes the numbers assigned be truly random. But, sometimes, it’s fun to do an out-of-a-hat method for assigning numbers at your Super Bowl party. In this case, the first template is a little neater.

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Chris Daniel

Chris Daniel

Chris is a spreadsheet expert and content writer. He has a double Bachelor's Degree in Teaching and has been working in the education industry for over 11 years. His experience makes him adept at breaking down complex topics so that everyone is able to understand.
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